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the reader and her books

INTP. I read for fun and personal enjoyment. I'm also a moody reader, so I might like a book one day and dislike it on a later reread (or the other way round).

Currently reading: The Asylum by John Harwood

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artpickings:

The Geography Series: Joan Didion on the Far West
From a series of typographic homages to literary geography: Six main regions of American literature, each celebrated with a passage from a beloved author representing the respective region. Quotes selected by Maria Popova, illustrated by Debbie Millman. Details and prints at the link.

artpickings:

The Geography Series: Joan Didion on the Far West

From a series of typographic homages to literary geography: Six main regions of American literature, each celebrated with a passage from a beloved author representing the respective region. Quotes selected by Maria Popova, illustrated by Debbie Millman. Details and prints at the link.

Books are, among my advisors, the ones I like the most, because neither hope nor fear keep them from telling me what to do.

(Source: queenofbanshee, via asolitarybookworm)

idyllspace:

theubergrump:

I keep seeing stuff about Lord of the Flies going around

Obviously, the individual experiences of the people making the posts - re: teachers, lessons, the way they were forced to study the book - aren’t up for debate

but like, I feel that people might not have the whole story here and as someone who knows far too much about literature, I wanted to talk about it a little

Sir William Golding wrote Lord of the Flies in response to an earlier novel called The Coral Island. In The Coral Island, a small group of upper-class British boys from a boarding school get stranded on an island and have an absolutely wonderful time. They look back on it as a fond adventure, where they had a little vacation, invented things, and generally made their well-bred high society English parents proud.

Sir William Golding read that novel and was disgusted by the way that R. M. Ballantyne used the plot as a huge essay on the superior intellect and higher morality of English folk (read: white people). The boys in The Coral Island eventually have to seek the aid of Christian missionaries (who are there to convert the local Polynesian populace) to save them from the natives who are written as raping pillaging amoral cannibals.

Sir William Golding set out to write a more realistic novel, by the way, using the same names for his main characters as Ballantyne did (although Golding’s characters are slightly younger). So, all the posts about Lord of the Flies showing the “human condition” insofar as it pertains to young middle-class British boys who grew up in a boarding house in the middle of the Cold War are correct. But I get the feeling that most people don’t realize that was the point of the novel.

Lord of the Flies was meant as a huge “fuck you” to the ingrained belief that English people are the most noble and wise of all people and thus incapable of descending into savagery. I doubt it was ever meant to be a sweeping generalized metaphor for the universal savage nature of humanity, and shame on the teachers who force that interpretation on their students.

So, really, Golding essentially created a transformative works remix of The Coral Island because it made him so angry.

(via dukeofmarlborough)

ericarehes:

endless list of favourite books
↳ The Secret History by Donna Tartt

“Why does that obstinate little voice in our heads torment us so? Could it be because it reminds us that we are alive, of our mortality, of our individual souls – which, after all, we are too afraid to surrender but yet make us feel more miserable than any other thing? It is a terrible thing to learn as a child that one is a being separate from the world, that no one and no thing hurts along with one’s burned tongues and skinned knees, that one’s aches and pains are all one’s own. Even more terrible, as we grow older, to learn that no person, no matter how beloved, can ever truly understand us. Our own selves make us most unhappy, and that’s why we’re so anxious to lose them, don’t you think?”

ericarehes:

endless list of favourite books

The Secret History by Donna Tartt

“Why does that obstinate little voice in our heads torment us so? Could it be because it reminds us that we are alive, of our mortality, of our individual souls – which, after all, we are too afraid to surrender but yet make us feel more miserable than any other thing? It is a terrible thing to learn as a child that one is a being separate from the world, that no one and no thing hurts along with one’s burned tongues and skinned knees, that one’s aches and pains are all one’s own. Even more terrible, as we grow older, to learn that no person, no matter how beloved, can ever truly understand us. Our own selves make us most unhappy, and that’s why we’re so anxious to lose them, don’t you think?”

(Source: charlesmmacaulay)

ericarehes:

endless list of favourite books
↳ Teeth by Hannah Moskowitz

“I close my eyes and listen to the ocean. I’m thinking about sailing, to England or maybe France. The way the wind would feel on my face and the sound of his voice screaming my name through his laughter. The waves would crash like applause. God, I remember when I used to be afraid of the ocean.” 

ericarehes:

endless list of favourite books

↳ Teeth by Hannah Moskowitz

“I close my eyes and listen to the ocean. 
I’m thinking about sailing, to England or maybe France. The way the wind would feel on my face and the sound of his voice screaming my name through his laughter. The waves would crash like applause. God, I remember when I used to be afraid of the ocean.” 

(Source: charlesmmacaulay)

ericarehes:

endless list of favourite books
↳ Wuthering Heights by Emily Brontë 

“He wanted all to lie in an ecstasy of peace; I wanted all to sparkle and dance in a glorious jubilee. I said his heaven would be only half alive; and he said mine would be drunk: I said I should fall asleep in his; and he said he could not breathe in mine.” 

ericarehes:

endless list of favourite books

Wuthering Heights by Emily Brontë 

“He wanted all to lie in an ecstasy of peace; I wanted all to sparkle and dance in a glorious jubilee. I said his heaven would be only half alive; and he said mine would be drunk: I said I should fall asleep in his; and he said he could not breathe in mine.” 

(Source: charlesmmacaulay, via nitrateglow)

Let it go - the
smashed word broken
open vow or
the oath cracked length
wise - let it go it
was sworn to
go

let them go - the
truthful liars and
the false fair friends
and the “boths” and
“neithers” - you must let them go they
were born
to go

let all go - the
big small middling
tall bigger really
the biggest and all
things - let all go
dear

so comes love.”

—e.e cummings, “Let It Go” (via fables-of-the-reconstruction)

(via lieutenantlipton)

chicagopubliclibrary:

Life Advice from Harper Lee 
From Letters of Note: 

A young fan of ‘To Kill a Mockingbird’ named Jeremy wrote to Harper Lee in 2006, and asked for a signed photo. He didn’t get one, but instead received this lovely piece of advice from the author that is far more precious. 

Harper Lee announced today - on her 88th birthday — that ‘To Kill A Mockingbird’ will now be released as an audiobook and e-book. 
Happy Birthday, Harper! 

chicagopubliclibrary:

Life Advice from Harper Lee 

From Letters of Note

A young fan of ‘To Kill a Mockingbird’ named Jeremy wrote to Harper Lee in 2006, and asked for a signed photo. He didn’t get one, but instead received this lovely piece of advice from the author that is far more precious. 

Harper Lee announced today - on her 88th birthday — that ‘To Kill A Mockingbird’ will now be released as an audiobook and e-book. 

Happy Birthday, Harper! 

(via fishingboatproceeds)

shakespearean:

Ralph Fiennes reads Sonnet 129 to close out the program Newsnight.

(Source: youtube.com, via nattie-k)


Happy World Book Day! (As if we need a special day to love books, but let’s just go with it.) Celebrate with Maira Kalman’s illustrated wisdom. 

Happy World Book Day! (As if we need a special day to love books, but let’s just go with it.) Celebrate with Maira Kalman’s illustrated wisdom

(Source: explore-blog, via thegirlandherbooks)

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